In Between Time
Years 4 - 10


In this activity you need a partner for discussion.
A parent or sibling or internet friend if learning at home, or a classmate at school.

Preparation

  • One clock each with hands you can turn.
    Note: Clocks like these are called analogue clocks.
    Say analogue like this ... anna-log
  • Another clock in the room that is showing the actual time.
    It could be analogue or digital.
    The clock on your phone will be okay.
  • Ruler and pencil.
  • This Recording Sheet.
  • Write the title of this challenge and today's date on a fresh page in your maths journal.

Getting Started

  • Click the photo on the right to play the video In Between Time.
    You can play the video again whenever you want to.

The information on the video
    and your own clocks
       and talking together
           will help you do the things below.

Answer Question 1 with help from the video.
Use the video player controls to go back or forward in time, or to pause time.

  1. When Doug turns his clock the hands they rotate in the direction of the numbers getting bigger (1, 2, 3, ...).
    This direction is called clockwise.
    1. Rotate your clock hands the opposite way. This is the direction of the numbers getting smaller (12, 11, 10, ...).
      This direction is called anti-clockwise.
    2. Stand up and face the window.
      Rotate yourself clockwise on the spot until you face the window again.
      Now rotate anti-clockwise on the spot until you face the window again.
      Where on the clock face do you imagine you were standing?
    3. When Doug rotated his clock hands to get to 10 o'clock he went clockwise. He could have gone anti-clockwise.
      From his starting point (near two o'clock) which way is quicker?
      Check by setting your clock to something near Doug's starting point and winding to 10 o'clock.
    4. Go to your refrigerator. Try to work out whether the door opens clockwise or anti-clockwise.
      Hint: The only thing similar about a fridge door and a clock is that they both have a point around which something rotates.
    5. Doug knew when he was coming near ten o'clock.
      What was the clue for knowing the o'clock was going to be 10?
    6. Doug knew when he was exactly at ten o'clock.
      What was the clue for knowing the exact o'clock moment?

Choose your own starting time and o'clock time.
Predict whether clockwise or anti-clockwise would be quicker to get to your o'clock.
Check by rotating the clock hands.

Have fun exploring In Between Time.

Keep exploring with your clock until you are ready to try the questions below.
Record your answers.

  1. Look at the first clock face on the Recording Sheet.
    Imagine you could step from mark to mark around the clock face.
    Start with both feet on 12.
    1. Step all the way around until you are back at the start. How many steps?
    2. How many steps would it be if you started at 3, ...or 7, ...or 10 and came back to whichever start you chose?
    3. If you are using the big hand to count these steps, each step is called one minute.
      How many minutes are measured when you go once around the clock?
    4. If you go once around the clock to count minutes does it matter where you start?
    5. What is another time measurement for going once around the clock?

  1. Copy and complete this sentence with numbers.
    ____ minutes and _____ hour measure the same amount of time.
    1. On the first clock face draw a minute hand and show what it does in one hour.
    2. On the second clock face draw a hour hand and show what it does in one hour.

  1. The dark marks around the clock face tell us two things. Copy and complete these sentences:
    1. The dark marks count the _____ .
    2. The dark marks count the _____ in groups of _____ .

  1. Copy and complete these sentences. Use your clock to help you:
    1. If the hour hand travels one mark past an o'clock it has travelled _____ of its journey towards the next hour. (Answer with a fraction.)
    2. In the same time the minute hand has travelled _____ marks towards the next hour. (Answer with a whole number.)
    3. In (b), what fraction of the journey to the next hour has been completed by the minute hand.

Optional
This is a little bit trickier, but the same sort of thinking as 5.

  1. Copy and complete these sentences. Use your clock to help you:
    1. If the minute hand travels one mark past an o'clock it has travelled _____ of its journey towards the next hour. (Answer with a fraction.)
    2. In the same time the hour hand has travelled _____ marks towards the next hour. (Answer with words or numbers or both.)

Challenge

  • Open this In Between Time task card.
    You can read it on screen or print it.
  • Investigate In Between Time further using the questions on the card.

 

 

Extra Challenge

  • Click the photo on the left to play the video Wait One Minute.
    You can play the video again whenever you want to.

    Did you notice that the silver hand uses the marks on the clock face to measure a different amount of time?

  • Copy and complete this sentence with numbers.
    ____ seconds and _____ minute measure the same amount of time.
  • Work out the challenge in the video and record your work.
  • Calculate the number of seconds in one year of 365 days.
    (There is a calculator on your phone if you need it.)
  • Starting today, if you lived in the same house for another one million seconds before you moved, what year, month, day and time would you move?
    Record your estimate first, then calculate.
    Record your working out in your journal in any way you want.

Just Before You Finish

  • In your journal choose something you learnt about measuring time in this activity and explain how you learnt it.
  • If you learnt more than one thing you can choose as many of them as you want.

 

Answers & Discussion

These notes were originally written for teachers. We have included them to support parents to help their child learn from In Between Time.

Send any comments or photos about this activity and we can start a gallery here.

 

Maths At Home is a division of Mathematics Centre