Time Together
Years 2 - 10


You could do this activity on your own, but it is more fun to spend time together with a partner.

Preparation

  • At least one clock with hands you can turn ... one clock each is better.
    Note: Clocks like these are called analogue clocks.
    Say analogue like this ... anna-log
  • Ruler and pencil.
  • At least 2 copies of this Recording Sheet.
    You might need more.
  • Write the title of this challenge and today's date on a fresh page in your maths journal.

Getting Started

  1. Sit with your partner. Turn the clock hands.
    • Talk about what happens.
    • Tell each other what you already know about how clocks show time.
    • In your journal draw your own clock face.
    • Write and draw to explain what you already know about analogue clock time.
    Stand up and pretend you are standing in the middle of a clock.
    Show your partner what it means to turn clockwise.
    What is it called if you turn the other way?
  1. Turn your clock over so you can't see its face.
    Look at the Recording Sheet.
    All the clock face drawings are the same.
    • On the first (1st) drawing explain what the numbers mean.
    • On the second (2nd) drawing explain the little marks around the edge of the white circle.
    • Some of the little marks are thicker than others.
      On the third (3rd) drawing write small numbers beside the thick ones to show what they mean.

Have fun exploring Time Together.

  1. Turn your clock over so you can't see its face.
    Rule arrows where you estimate the hands will be for this time.
    • One o'clock

    Turn your clock over and move the hands to find the answer.
    Rule dotted lines to show the clock's answer. Were you close?

    Now repeat those steps for these times.

    • Quarter past one o'clock
    • Quarter to one o'clock
  1. Turn your clock over so you can't see its face.
    Choose three special times of the day for you - when you go to sleep, or lunchtime, or when the school bus comes, or ...
    • Rule arrows to estimate each special time on its own clock face.
    • Turn your clock over and move the hands to find each answer.
    • Rule dotted lines to show the clock's answer. Were you close?

Challenge

  1. We know that at exactly 12 o'clock the big hand is exactly on top of the small hand.
    Make that time on your clock.
    Turn your clock over so you can't see its face.

    Soon after one o'clock the big hand is exactly on top of the small hand again.

    • Estimate this time and record your estimate by ruling arrows.

    Turn your clock over and move the hands to find the answer.

    • Rule dotted lines to show the clock's answer.
      Were you close?
  1. Repeat these steps for the next time to hands are together.
    Then the next.
    Then the next.
    Then...
    ...until you have found all the times the hands are together.
    How many are there?

Extra Challenge

This challenge is voluntary. If you don't think you can do it right now, you can come back to it another day.
Find a way to calculate the times when the big hand is exactly on top of the small hand.

Just Before You Finish

  • Look back at what you wrote about time in your journal.
  • What do you know now that you didn't know before you started Time Together?
  • Write and draw about your new knowledge.
  • Read your Working Like A Mathematician page again and write three or more sentences explaining how you worked like a mathematician to learn this new knowledge.

 

Answers & Discussion

These notes were originally written for teachers. We have included them to support parents to help their child learn from Time Together.

Send any comments or photos about this activity and we can start a gallery here.

 

Maths At Home is a division of Mathematics Centre